This is the joint website of  Women Against Rape and Black Women's Rape Action Project. Both organisations are based on self-help and provide support, legal information and advocacy. We campaign for justice and protection for all women and girls, including asylum seekers, who have suffered sexual, domestic and/or racist violence.

WAR was founded in 1976. It has won changes in the law, such as making rape in marriage a crime, set legal precedents and achieved compensation for many women. BWRAP was founded in 1991. It focuses on getting justice for women of colour, bringing out the particular discrimination they face. It has prevented the deportation of many rape survivors. Both organisations are multiracial.

 

 

 

Mothers

You encouraged my daughter go to court

Success story

March 28, 2011

I am writing this letter to thank WAR and particularly Sally for the support my daughter and I received during a very difficult time in her life.

The rape, the medical consequences, the threats of retaliation from the assailants family and friends, all the positive outpouring of support avenues and working with the MET were the biggest things I have ever dealt with as a parent.... and my daughter was devastated and overwhelmed by everything going on around her.

I used all the resources I was offered as best I could. Counselling, court visits, lots of phone calls to friends and family. As the time for the trial approached my daughter could not seem to decide to testify. It was intensely painful for her. She knew she wanted to but all the thoughts of what that meant would convince her otherwise.

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Mothers win right to family life in the UK

Success story

Mothers win right to family life in the UK

Two mothers, both of whom have lived in the UK for over 10 years and whose children were born here, have resisted efforts to return them to Jamaica and have now won the right to stay in the UK under Article 8 of the Human Rights Act (Article 8, the right to respect for private and family life.)  One woman took part in the 40 day hunger strike at Yarl’s Wood Removal Centre to bring attention to the injustice of her case.

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Join us on the Mothers March and Speak Out, central London, 12 March

Event

Start and End Dates

 

Dear friends,

We invite you to the Mothers March and Speak Out on Saturday 12 March which we have endorsed.  Many rape survivors took part last year; we hope many will again.  We want to make visible the experiences of mothers and other carers who are rape survivors, or whose children are rape survivors, and how fighting for justice and protection is part of the caring work we do for our loved ones.  Over 90% of rapists go free, while increasingly rape victims are being jailed for so-called false allegations. 

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Can You Hear us? Michelle, 14 January 2010

Resource

image045.pngI’ve lived in the UK for almost nine years now.  I’ve got my indefinite to remain in this country.  I was sentenced to two years in prison for shop lifting which I did because I had to support my children and also because my husband is very abusive to me.  I have two children that were born in this country, one of which is six years, however I was still served with a deportation order while I was in prison.  And I was detained for eight and a half months in Yarl’s Wood.   My children were put with a family friend and were being supervised by social services.

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We are here because . . .

Resource

We are here because . . .

. . .  is an inspiring and moving collection of online video and other testimonies, filmed, recorded, edited and produced by Black/women of colour, who are service users and volunteers with Black Women’s Rape Action Project. The testimonies are the product of an invaluable process whereby women from different backgrounds worked together, developed technical skills, and learnt from each other.

The majority are members of the All African Women’s Group a self-help group of women asylum seekers.  Most are mothers, some have been in detention, many have been separated from their children.  All give deeply compelling and often painful accounts of what they have been, and still go through, to get protection and rebuild their lives.

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Report: Women's Hunger Strike - Louder than Words

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When 70 women went on hunger strike in Yarl’s Wood IRC on 5 February, an unprecedented level of media coverage followed. Rape survivors, mothers separated from their children, and other vulnerable women, some of whom had been detained without trial for months (one for over a year), spoke publicly to complain about the conditions they suffered, why they were driven to protest, and how they resisted official attempts to deny and subvert their action.

On 29 June, a packed meeting in the House of Commons hosted by John McDonnell MP, and chaired by Stella Mpaka, All African Women’s Group (AAWG) and Cristel Amiss, Black Women’s Rape Action Project (BWRAP) brought together: women central to the hunger strike, legal and medical professionals, family members of women still detained and a wide range of other organisations and individuals.

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URGENT ACTION: End the Detention of Familes

Dear friends,

Over 80 people attended the House of Commons meeting Women’s Hunger Strike – Louder than Words (29 June 2010) which succeeded in making public how women seeking asylum are spearheading the movement against the injustice of the asylum system (and other injustices), and in gathering support for these efforts. We will be publishing a report shortly.

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Public Meeting: Women’s Hunger Strike Louder Than Words

Event

Start and End Dates

Over 40 days • across races & languages • mothers defend families • many released • deportations halted.

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Yarl’s Wood Update: Releases, Returns, Reprisals, 9 June 2010

RELEASES: THIRTEEN FORMER HUNGER STRIKERS HAVE NOW BEEN RELEASED of the 25 or so we were in touch with on a daily basis.
All had spent months in detention and one woman had been there for a year and a half. Some had WON THEIR CASE but were being kept inside by a vindictive Home Office which was appealing the judgement. Women described feeling like forgotten people. One of the key demands of the hunger strike was for an end to indefinite detention.

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We must end the detention of families

In the Media

The Guardian, Tuesday 18 May 2010  Letters

"We will end the detention of children for immigration purposes," says the new coalition government (Asylum children will be kept out of 'distressing' detention centres, 14 May). But what about their mothers?

Paediatricians and psychologists have testified to the mental and physical harm caused to children by detention. But separating them from their mother or primary carer is even worse; it may cause "insecurity, depression and anxiety" which lasts throughout life.

The recent six-week hunger strike by women in Yarl's Wood removal centre brought to public attention that many women detained inside are mothers whose children were taken by social services or other family members. Some face deportation and permanent separation, often after years of raising a family in the UK.

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