This is the joint website of  Women Against Rape and Black Women's Rape Action Project. Both organisations are based on self-help and provide support, legal information and advocacy. We campaign for justice and protection for all women and girls, including asylum seekers, who have suffered sexual, domestic and/or racist violence.

WAR was founded in 1976. It has won changes in the law, such as making rape in marriage a crime, set legal precedents and achieved compensation for many women. BWRAP was founded in 1991. It focuses on getting justice for women of colour, bringing out the particular discrimination they face. It has prevented the deportation of many rape survivors. Both organisations are multiracial.

 

 

 

Oxford

Government ‘Response’ To Child Rape Is A Smokescreen

In the Media

Morning Star 12 MARCH 2015

LISA LONGSTAFF from Women Against Rape and CRISTEL AMISS of the Black Women’s Rape Action Project examine the state’s attempts at obfuscation

Far from tackling rape, the government’s response to the review into the child rape epidemic in Oxford is a merely smokescreen to “manage” the outcry.

The government proposes to make it compulsory to report any underage sexual activity as child abuse. But this would increase the power of the state to control children rather than the power of children and their families to get justice.
It also hides child rape, calling it abuse or exploitation instead. And it disconnects child survivors from adult survivors, especially women. And let’s not forget that only 5.7 per cent of recorded rape ends in conviction and that 90 per cent of rapists get away with it.

Tags:

WAR’s comment on the government response to the serious case review about Oxford

The government’s response to today’s review of child rape in Oxford about an epidemic of rape of children, especially those in care, is a smokescreen to manage the outcry rather than deal with the rape.

In response to the Oxford rape and child abuse, the government proposes to make it compulsory to report any underage sexual activity as child abuse. This is another smokescreen aimed at increasing the power of the state to control children rather than the power of children and their families to get justice. It is also a way of hiding child rape (calling it abuse or exploitation instead), and of disconnecting the neglect of the rape of young girls and boys from the neglect of rape of adults, especially of women. Let´s not forget that only 6.7% of rape ends in conviction and that 90% of rapists get away with it. (‘Why do the police deal with rape cases so badly?’)

Tags:
Syndicate content